Tuesday, Apr 07th, 2020 - 10:03:52

Orientalism

Dismaland - Banksy

"Dismaland" - Banksy (2015)

"Are you looking for an alternative to the soulless sugar-coated banality of the average family day out? Or just somewhere cheaper. Then this is the place for you—a chaotic new world where you can escape from mindless escapism. Instead of a burger stall, we have a museum. In place of a gift shop we have a library, well, we have a gift shop as well. Bring the whole family to come and enjoy the latest addition to our chronic leisure surplus—a bemusement park. A theme park whose big theme is: theme parks should have bigger themes… This event contains adult themes, distressing imagery, extended use of strobe lighting, smoke effects and swearing. The following items are strictly prohibited: knives, spraycans, illegal drugs, and lawyers from the Walt Disney corporation."

“Internacional” - Paco Pomet (2008)

'Inspired by the 19th and 20th century photography, using historical references to confront the viewer with repetitive human mistakes especially concerning environmental issues, the degradation of human behavior and relationships, the artist brings together antithetical aspects of a regressive society driven by a collective lack of responsibility and low-minded leaders. This ironic Golden Age, generator of mankind’s persistent crisis, is constructed through a series of symbols and alterations, imaginary distortions and intense color interventions that reveal the essence, as well as the causes and effects of where we stand today. Bleeding trees, the tragedy and comedy of violence, greed and carelessness become part of a disordered normality.'

'Las Hurdes: Tierra Sin Pan': Luis Buñuel (1933)

'The surrealist movement in poetry, literature, and film overlapped with the emerging discipline of modern anthropology in France. Writing about French culture between the wars, James Clifford has coined the term "ethnographic surrealism" to describe the intersection of anthropology and art in Paris in the 1920s and 1930s. Unlike traditional anthropological discourses, which strive to make the unfamiliar comprehensible, ethnographic surrealism, Clifford writes, "attacks the familiar, provoking the irruption of otherness -- the unexpected" (1988: 145). Luis Buñuel lived and worked in Paris during this period of interdisciplinary ferment.'

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